Tag Archives: napkin

RAMIE FABRIC | CHINA GRASS

Ramie is one of the oldest vegetable fibers and has been used for thousands of years for manufacturing ramie fabrics. The true ramie or ‘China Grass’ is also known as ‘white ramie’ and is the Chinese cultivated plant.
RamieThe extraction of the fiber occurs in three stages. First the cortex or bark is removed.This can be done by hand or by machine.This process is called decortication.Second the cortex is scraped to remove most of the outer bark, the parenchyma in the bast layer and some of the gums and pectins. Finally the residual cortex material is washed, dried, and de-gummed to extract the spinnable fiber.Plant has large heart shaped, crenate leaves covered on the underside with white hairs that give it a silvery appearance. Ramie is not as durable as other fibers, and so ramie is most often blended with other fibers for its unique strength and absorbency, luster and dye-affinity. A coarse fiber, ramie fabric is pure white and silk like in appearance.
Ramie is commonly used in tablecloths, napkins, sweaters, shirts, blouses, and suiting and handkerchiefs.The main producers of ramie are China, Brazil, Philippines, India, South Korea and Thailand.

AZLON FABRIC FROM AZLON FIBRE

Azlon is the generic name for a manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is composed of any regenerated naturally occurring proteins.Proteins from corn, soybeans, peanuts, fish, and milk have been used. Azlon consists of polymeric amino acids.

It is produced, like other synthetic fibres, by converting the raw material to a solution that is extruded through a spinneret and then stretched to improve the alignment of the chains of molecules making up the fibres.

Azlon fibers have a soft hand, and blend well with other fibers and used in blends to add a wool-like hand to other fibers, and to add loft, softness, and resiliency. Azlon fibers resist moths and mildew, do not shrink, and impart a cashmere-like hand to blended fabrics.Many of the garments are made with “soy” are actually Azlon.